HTASA - History Teachers' Assocation of SA

When? A game of sequencing. 


One of the most basic skills for students that students are asked to explore is that of sequencing.  A review of the Achievement Standards of the Australian Curriculum History reveals a common thread.

 

Foundation Year Achievement Standard

Students sequence familiar events in order.

 

Year 1 Achievement Standard

Students sequence events in order, using everyday terms about the passing of time.

 

Year 2 Achievement Standard

 Students sequence events in order, using a range of terms related to time.

 

Year 3 Achievement Standard

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, with reference to key dates.

 

Year 4 Achievement Standard

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order to identify key dates.


Year 5 Achievement Standard

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, using timelines. 


Year 6 Achievement Standard

 Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, and represent time by creating timelines.


Year 7 Achievement Standard

 Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, using dating conventions to represent and measure time.

 

Year 8 Achievement Standard

Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework with reference to periods of time.

 

Year 9 Achievement Standard

Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework with reference to periods of time and  their duration.



Year 10 Achievement Standard 

Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, and identify relationships between events across different places and periods of time.

 



Our first game looks at sequencing.   While the steps you make take will vary a little bit according to the year level the basic pattern is the same.

 

Step 1:

Decide upon categories that will be identified as having significance. In the very early years these relate to events of a very personal nature (eg family birthdays) but they soon encompass a broader scope and encompass national holidays (eg ANZAC Day) as well as important years (eg 1901).   By the time students have reached Year 8 the events and developments are quite diverse.

 

By Year 7 and 8 we are looking for recognition of EconomicPolitical and Social transformation across a range of cultures and times. These terms are explored and specific headings are placed under each of them. For this game we are after events and developments which are important AND interesting. These typically encompass topics such as:

 

Politics :      leaders, wars, battles, elections

Society  :    toys, fashion, gender, food, music, entertainment

Economy:   industry, agriculture, invention, money, trade.

 

These categories serve as the basis for the student research and initial input into the game.

 

 

Step 2: 

We then make a grid to help guide the research.  I commonly do this on the shared resources of Google Doc, but it can just as easily be done on a whiteboard.  Students are encouraged to place a mark in the appropriate box to let us know what has been covered and what still needs to be explored.

 

 

Ancient

Medieval

Modern

Toys

*

 

****

Music

 

*

****

Sport

 

*

**

Inventions

 

**

 

Exploration

*

 

***

 

 

Step 3: 

Taking guidance from the table and using the grid to help frame a legitimate search (ie "toys medieval") students locate interesting and useful information.

 

Another approach is to show the students the myriad of timelines that are available on the internet dedicated to specific topics.  Some examples are

 

Step 4: 

Students contribute their information to the class database/spreadsheet.   We often colour code the cards so that it is easy to add/remove those from particular areas of the course.  The year 12 History cards are, by the very nature of the subject, closer in time and with more subject specific knowledge. 

 

 

 

Step 5: 

The cards are printed, cut up and shuffled. 

 

Step 6:

The rules are explained to the groups. I recommend no more than 5 per group.

  • The aim is to be the first to get 15 cards in a correct sequence. 
  • The shuffled pile of cards is placed in the middle of the table face down.
  • Everyone takes one card and places it face up in front of themselves, but so that everyone else can see it easily.
  • One person (eg: Mary) takes a card from the pile, and without letting anyone else see the card, reads the words to the person on their left (eg Robert). They do not announce the date. They keep the card hidden from all the other players.
  • If the card is put in the correct sequence by Robert it remains with him and then he picks a card to read to the person on his left.  Everyone can see the growing column of correct sequences and makes decisons based upon this.  
  • If, however, Robert had indicated the wrong sequence he is passed over and Alice would have a chance to make a decision.  Should all of the group fail to place the card in the correct sequence it returns to Mary (who had picked it from the pile) and adds to her column.
  • As the columns grow it is essential to pick the right sequence and so we move from "before" or "after" to  "between". 

A typical sequence may grow like this:

 

 

 

 

Click here for a pdf of the database file which you can print and use.

 

Enjoy.

 

Head of History

Scotch College Adelaide

 

 

 

 

 

When? A game of sequencing. 


One of the most basic skills for students that students are asked to explore is that of sequencing.  A review of the Achievement Standards of the Australian Curriculum History reveals a common thread.

 

Foundation Year Achievement Standard

Students sequence familiar events in order.

 

Year 1 Achievement Standard

Students sequence events in order, using everyday terms about the passing of time.

 

Year 2 Achievement Standard

 Students sequence events in order, using a range of terms related to time.

 

Year 3 Achievement Standard

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, with reference to key dates.

 

Year 4 Achievement Standard

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order to identify key dates.


Year 5 Achievement Standard

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, using timelines. 


Year 6 Achievement Standard

 Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, and represent time by creating timelines.


Year 7 Achievement Standard

 Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, using dating conventions to represent and measure time.

 

Year 8 Achievement Standard

Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework with reference to periods of time.

 

Year 9 Achievement Standard

Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework with reference to periods of time and  their duration.



Year 10 Achievement Standard 

Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, and identify relationships between events across different places and periods of time.

 



Our first game looks at sequencing.   While the steps you make take will vary a little bit according to the year level the basic pattern is the same.

 

Step 1:

Decide upon categories that will be identified as having significance. In the very early years these relate to events of a very personal nature (eg family birthdays) but they soon encompass a broader scope and encompass national holidays (eg ANZAC Day) as well as important years (eg 1901).   By the time students have reached Year 8 the events and developments are quite diverse.

 

By Year 7 and 8 we are looking for recognition of EconomicPolitical and Social transformation across a range of cultures and times. These terms are explored and specific headings are placed under each of them. For this game we are after events and developments which are important AND interesting. These typically encompass topics such as:

 

Politics :      leaders, wars, battles, elections

Society  :    toys, fashion, gender, food, music, entertainment

Economy:   industry, agriculture, invention, money, trade.

 

These categories serve as the basis for the student research and initial input into the game.

 

 

Step 2: 

We then make a grid to help guide the research.  I commonly do this on the shared resources of Google Doc, but it can just as easily be done on a whiteboard.  Students are encouraged to place a mark in the appropriate box to let us know what has been covered and what still needs to be explored.

 

 

Ancient

Medieval

Modern

Toys

*

 

****

Music

 

*

****

Sport

 

*

**

Inventions

 

**

 

Exploration

*

 

***

 

 

Step 3: 

Taking guidance from the table and using the grid to help frame a legitimate search (ie "toys medieval") students locate interesting and useful information.

 

Another approach is to show the students the myriad of timelines that are available on the internet dedicated to specific topics.  Some examples are

 

Step 4: 

Students contribute their information to the class database/spreadsheet.   We often colour code the cards so that it is easy to add/remove those from particular areas of the course.  The year 12 History cards are, by the very nature of the subject, closer in time and with more subject specific knowledge. 

 

 

 

Step 5: 

The cards are printed, cut up and shuffled. 

 

Step 6:

The rules are explained to the groups. I recommend no more than 5 per group.

  • The aim is to be the first to get 15 cards in a correct sequence. 
  • The shuffled pile of cards is placed in the middle of the table face down.
  • Everyone takes one card and places it face up in front of themselves, but so that everyone else can see it easily.
  • One person (eg: Mary) takes a card from the pile, and without letting anyone else see the card, reads the words to the person on their left (eg Robert). They do not announce the date. They keep the card hidden from all the other players.
  • If the card is put in the correct sequence by Robert it remains with him and then he picks a card to read to the person on his left.  Everyone can see the growing column of correct sequences and makes decisons based upon this.  
  • If, however, Robert had indicated the wrong sequence he is passed over and Alice would have a chance to make a decision.  Should all of the group fail to place the card in the correct sequence it returns to Mary (who had picked it from the pile) and adds to her column.
  • As the columns grow it is essential to pick the right sequence and so we move from "before" or "after" to  "between". 

A typical sequence may grow like this:

 

 

 

 

Click here for a pdf of the database file which you can print and use.

 

Enjoy.

 

Head of History

Scotch College Adelaide