HTASA - History Teachers' Assocation of SA

Fact? A game of contestability.



The purpose of this game is to expose students to the contestable nature of historical "fact".  They are challenged to research topics and provide 10 interesting, entertaining and true statements.  Each of the statements must be alongside the url so the class can be certain of the veracity of the statement and the imprimatur of the source. 

They are then challenged to invent 10  interesting, entertaining and plausible but false statements. Needless to say you can't just make up a false statement without researching to prove that it is not true - there is a lot of interrogation of the internet happening at this stage.  All of the statements are placed into our shared online document.



In the first column is the contributor.  The X in the second indicates that the statement has been checked by one of the class editors who has as a minimum attempted to disprove the false statement and by visiting the site of the facts.

An important class exercise is to check that the source of the data is authoritative enough that is can be considered valid.

Once we have a list that has been approved the false statements are turned red and the others are left. They are then printed and cut out into slips of paper and are used as quiz questions.



In the first stages students are able to use access to the internet to search for answers.  They have 30 seconds in order to determine if  "a fact is a fact" or, much more difficult, to prove that "that fact is a lie". The game forces them to construct rapid and accurate search requests.

I commonly use this as a means to let the class out of the door.  Students draw a card from the box and only upon deciding correctly the truthfulness or not are allowed out.  It is common to hear guffaws of laughter from those back in the line who are proud that their question has tricked a peer. At this stage the research is complete and we are testing factual recall in an entertaining fashion.

Click here to download a pdf file with a Medieval "fact or lie" samplefor use in your classroom.

Enjoy.

 

Malcolm Massie

Head of History

Scotch College Adelaide

 

 

Fact? A game of contestability.



The purpose of this game is to expose students to the contestable nature of historical "fact".  They are challenged to research topics and provide 10 interesting, entertaining and true statements.  Each of the statements must be alongside the url so the class can be certain of the veracity of the statement and the imprimatur of the source. 

They are then challenged to invent 10  interesting, entertaining and plausible but false statements. Needless to say you can't just make up a false statement without researching to prove that it is not true - there is a lot of interrogation of the internet happening at this stage.  All of the statements are placed into our shared online document.



In the first column is the contributor.  The X in the second indicates that the statement has been checked by one of the class editors who has as a minimum attempted to disprove the false statement and by visiting the site of the facts.

An important class exercise is to check that the source of the data is authoritative enough that is can be considered valid.

Once we have a list that has been approved the false statements are turned red and the others are left. They are then printed and cut out into slips of paper and are used as quiz questions.



In the first stages students are able to use access to the internet to search for answers.  They have 30 seconds in order to determine if  "a fact is a fact" or, much more difficult, to prove that "that fact is a lie". The game forces them to construct rapid and accurate search requests.

I commonly use this as a means to let the class out of the door.  Students draw a card from the box and only upon deciding correctly the truthfulness or not are allowed out.  It is common to hear guffaws of laughter from those back in the line who are proud that their question has tricked a peer. At this stage the research is complete and we are testing factual recall in an entertaining fashion.

Click here to download a pdf file with a Medieval "fact or lie" samplefor use in your classroom.

Enjoy.

 

Malcolm Massie

Head of History

Scotch College Adelaide