HTASA - History Teachers' Assocation of SA

Doodles? A game of when and what?

I know that most of us use Google as the default search engine.  However, I wonder how many have been making use of the Google Doodles! These are the beautifully crafted little images which appear around the search box.

While some of them are simply recognizing holidays many, if not most, of the recent ones have been made to celebrate the achievements of people in history.

I have found them a useful source of 5 minute research lessons and the source for games.

For each Google Doodle just click on the image to get the data. To see all the Doodles just visit the Gallery (http://www.google.com/doodles/).

 

The images are particularly useful for sequencing exercises or games with the JS students.  In the Australian Curriculum Geography we read:

 Foundation Year Achievement Standard

·      Students sequence familiar events in order.

Year 1 Achievement Standard

·       Students sequence events in order, using everyday terms about the passing of time.

Year 2 Achievement Standard

·       Students sequence events in order, using a range of terms related to time.

Year 3 Achievement Standard

·       Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, with reference to key dates.

Year 4 Achievement Standard

·       Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order to identify key dates.

Year 5 Achievement Standard

·       Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, using timelines. 

I have taken a series  of the Google Doodles related to significant events in a year. 

I have printed them out on cards without giving the name or the date.  This is to encourage students to explore the images in detail.  Along side the doodles I have printed cards which have the event and also the date.  Some of the events (eg Easter) do not have a fixed date whereas others (eg ANZAC Day) do. This is important as it allows the students to explore different ways of measuring time.  Most of the events I have selected are Australian but there are also those for US Independence Day (4th July) and Bastille Day (14th July) so that students are introduced to a wider perspective.   

 

Students are asked to

·                     explore the imagery in the Doodles

·                     try to place them into a typical year with the correct sequence using the Doodles only

·                     try to place them with the correct sequence using the date cards

·                     add in their own birthdays and other significant family events.

Click here to download a pdf to get you started.

 

 

Enjoy.

Malcolm Massie
Head of History
Scotch College Adelaide

Doodles? A game of when and what?

I know that most of us use Google as the default search engine.  However, I wonder how many have been making use of the Google Doodles! These are the beautifully crafted little images which appear around the search box.

While some of them are simply recognizing holidays many, if not most, of the recent ones have been made to celebrate the achievements of people in history.

I have found them a useful source of 5 minute research lessons and the source for games.

For each Google Doodle just click on the image to get the data. To see all the Doodles just visit the Gallery (http://www.google.com/doodles/).

 

The images are particularly useful for sequencing exercises or games with the JS students.  In the Australian Curriculum Geography we read:

 Foundation Year Achievement Standard

·      Students sequence familiar events in order.

Year 1 Achievement Standard

·       Students sequence events in order, using everyday terms about the passing of time.

Year 2 Achievement Standard

·       Students sequence events in order, using a range of terms related to time.

Year 3 Achievement Standard

·       Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, with reference to key dates.

Year 4 Achievement Standard

·       Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order to identify key dates.

Year 5 Achievement Standard

·       Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, using timelines. 

I have taken a series  of the Google Doodles related to significant events in a year. 

I have printed them out on cards without giving the name or the date.  This is to encourage students to explore the images in detail.  Along side the doodles I have printed cards which have the event and also the date.  Some of the events (eg Easter) do not have a fixed date whereas others (eg ANZAC Day) do. This is important as it allows the students to explore different ways of measuring time.  Most of the events I have selected are Australian but there are also those for US Independence Day (4th July) and Bastille Day (14th July) so that students are introduced to a wider perspective.   

 

Students are asked to

·                     explore the imagery in the Doodles

·                     try to place them into a typical year with the correct sequence using the Doodles only

·                     try to place them with the correct sequence using the date cards

·                     add in their own birthdays and other significant family events.

Click here to download a pdf to get you started.

 

 

Enjoy.

Malcolm Massie
Head of History
Scotch College Adelaide